Events

September

Destined to Crash: Cassini’s Grand Finale

7:30 pm - 8:30 pm
September 18, 2017
Beckman Auditorium

Join KPCC's science reporter Jacob Margolis and the Planetary Society's Mat Kaplan for an event that celebrates the life of Cassini and the people who made the mission possible. Margolis will take guests on a storytelling adventure through Cassini's mission — its perilous swings past gas giants, icy rings and moons that carry the precursors for life. Kaplan will lead an onstage discussion with the JPL scientists and engineers who have been working on the project since the 1980s and made it all possible.

This event is free, but reservations are required. Reserve your space on the KPCC website here.

Caltech Associates & Office of Gift Planning Luncheon Series: The Immune System vs. HIV

11:00 am - 1:00 pm
September 27, 2017
Athenaeum

11:00 a.m. Reception
11:45 a.m. Luncheon and program

It is now more than 30 years after the first AIDS epidemic, and an effective vaccine has continued to evade us—partly due to the virus' quick mutations to antibodies. Pamela Bjorkman, the Centennial Professor of Biology, will talk about the body's complex immune system, share Caltech's advances in understanding the immune response to HIV, and describe how she is working to prevent the infection, at our luncheon in partnership with the Office of Gift Planning.

View the save the date

For inquiries, please contact Ruby Rico with the Caltech Associates office at caltechassociates@caltech.edu or (626) 395-6392.

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This event is open to members of the Caltech Associates and guests. For more information and to learn how to join, please visit our website or contact the Associates office at (626) 395-3919

With a proud history of support dating back to 1926, the Caltech Associates are a vibrant organization of more than 2,000 members who are investors in discovery. Membership helps advance Caltech's most ambitious projects, including new treatments for disease, insights into nature, and technologies that could change the way people live their lives.

Caltech is changing the world. You can be part of it by joining the Caltech Associates and help shape tomorrow. Visit: www.associates.caltech.edu

 

 

 

 

 

Modern Campus Tour

4:30 pm - 7:30 pm
September 28, 2017
Athenaeum

Curious about all the new buildings on campus?  Meet at the front steps of the Athenaeum to join this afternoon tour led by the Caltech Women's Club CATS to catch up on all the recent construction on campus. After the tour join the CWC table at at the Rath Al Fresco for light refreshments.

Tour Cost: Free

To RSVP, go to https://cwc.nationbuilder.com/modern_campus_tour.  Please RSVP by Monday, Sep 25th.

October

The Resnick Young Investigators Symposium

9:30 am - 4:30 pm
October 2, 2017
Ramo Auditorium
The Resnick Young Investigators Symposium 
Celebrating innovation in the science & technology of sustainability 
Monday, October 2, 2017  |  Ramo Auditorium
9:30 am to 4:30 pm
 
Join us for a day in celebration of innovation in the science and technology of sustainability. This one-day academic program is designed to shine a spotlight on young researchers who have established research initiatives that show great promise in tackling some of the biggest science and engineering challenges toward a sustainable future. This event is free and open to the public.
 
No RSVP required and seating is on a first come basis.
 
SCHEDULE
 
9:30 am
Coffee and Conversation on the Patio
 
10:00 am
Opening Comments
 Jonas Peters, Bren Professor of Chemistry and Director of the Resnick Sustainability Institute
 
10:15 am
Shane Ardo Assistant Professor of Chemistry, and Chemical Engineering and Materials Science at UC Irvine
Is Water the Ideal Semiconductor for Direct Solar-Cell-Driven Desalination?
 
11:00 am
Nandini Ananth Assistant Professor in the Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology at Cornell University
Designing Organic Molecules for Solar Photon Harvesting
 
11:45 am 
Lunch Break (Unhosted except for speakers and invited guests)
 
1:30 pm
Scott Jasechko Assistant Professor of Water Resources at the University of Calgary
The Age of Global Fresh Water Resources
 
2:15 pm
Desirée Plata Assistant Professor of Chemical & Environmental Engineering; Associate Director for Research, Center for Green Chemistry & Green Engineering at Yale
Can Controlling Matter at the Atomic Scale Solve Global-Scale Problems: Environmental Optimization Enables Precision Carbon Nanotube Synthesis
 
3:00 pm
Afternoon Break on the Patio
 
3:30 pm
Aditya D. Mohite Light-to-Energy Team Leader at Los Alamos National Laboratory
Optoelectronic Properties of Near Single-Crystalline Halide Perovskites
 
4:30 pm
Closing comments/End
 
For further details see: http://resnick.caltech.edu/symposium2017.php

 

Caltech Playreaders 67th Season: “The Rivals” by Richard Brinsley Sheridan

7:30 pm - 10:00 pm
October 3, 2017
Athenaeum, Hall of Associates

Directed by Mark Kozlowski

The first of Sheridan’s plays, The Rivals, presented in 1775, is a robust comedy of manners. In
the Gilded Era in the town of Bath, two pairs of well-born young lovers swan about with
thoroughly modern levels of privilege, ennui, and general self-absorption. They are assisted in
their intrigues by Sheridan’s finest creation, Mrs. Malaprop, whose memorable mangling of the
English tongue is driven by a universal foible: she’s trying to appear smarter than she is. The
fireworks of Sheridan’s verbal wit illuminate his characters’ affectation, artifice, and pretense.

Admission is $3.00 for members of the Caltech Women's Club; $4.00 for all others. Light refreshments will be served after the reading.

To dine at the Athenaeum beforehand, call (626) 395-8204 for reservations. Plan to be seated by 5:30. You are welcome to join the Playreaders table.

Caltech-Huntington Humanities Collaborations (CHHC) Seminar: Rory Cox, Caltech

4:00 pm - 5:00 pm
October 5, 2017
Dabney Hall 110 (Treasure Room)

Please check later for additional details

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About the series: The CHHC program is organized around an ongoing series of two-year interdisciplinary research modules, developed and coordinated by a small group of Caltech faculty members and Huntington residential research fellows. The 2016–2018 CHHC module, titled “Violence and Order Past and Present,” studies the various roles that violence has played in political and social order, as well as the possible norms and cultural attitudes that have governed its use. Learn more at chhc.caltech.edu.

Caltech Science Museum’s Beckman Room Open for Walk-Ins

1:00 pm - 4:00 pm
October 6, 2017
Beckman Institute 131

The Beckman Room on the ground floor of the Beckman Institute (room 131) is a small museum devoted to the history of chemistry and to the scientific and philanthropic work of Arnold O. Beckman. During the Academic Year, the museum will be open to walk-in visitors from 1 to 4 PM on the first Friday of each month.

The museum is also open by appointment to individuals and groups. Please contact the Caltech Archives for appointment information.

Low Lily with John Whelan

8:00 pm - 10:00 pm
October 7, 2017
Beckman Institute Auditorium

The New England-based string and vocal trio, Low Lily (formerly Annalivia) explores the roots and branches of American folk music with traditional influences and modern inspiration that weaves together a unique brand of acoustic music.

Liz Simmons (vocals and guitar), Flynn Cohen (vocals, guitar, and mandolin), and Lissa Schneckenburger (vocals and fiddle) are masterful players with deep relationships to traditional music styles ranging from bluegrass, to Irish, Scottish, New England, and Old Time Appalachian sounds. They have all traveled the world extensively, performing with an impressive variety of well known musicians. When you combine this with stellar composition skills and inventive arrangements you get music that is rooted yet contemporary.

Low Lily will be joined by John Whelan, accordion player extraordinaire, originally from Dunstable, England and of Irish stock. He moved to the U.S. in 1980 and now lives in Connecticut.

More Info: http://lowlily.com and http://johnwhelanmusic.com

Buy Tickets

Caltech Public Events

Pasadena Folk Music Society

Associates Program: President’s Circle Garden Party

5:00 pm - 9:00 pm
October 7, 2017
President's Residence

5:00 p.m. Reception
6:00 p.m. Dinner and program

President Thomas F. Rosenbaum and Katherine T. Faber, Simon Ramo Professor of Materials Science, invite President's Circle members for a special evening of celebration for your support of and commitment to Caltech and the Associates.

For inquiries, please contact Ruby Rico with the Caltech Associates office at caltechassociates@caltech.edu or (626) 395-6392.

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This event is open to President's Circle members of the Caltech Associates. For more information and to learn how to join, please visit our website or contact the Associates office at (626) 395-3919

With a proud history of support dating back to 1926, the Caltech Associates are a vibrant organization of more than 2,000 members who are investors in discovery. Membership helps advance Caltech's most ambitious projects, including new treatments for disease, insights into nature, and technologies that could change the way people live their lives.

Caltech is changing the world. You can be part of it by joining the Caltech Associates and help shape tomorrow. Visit:https://www.associates.caltech.edu

 

An Ounce of Prevention

2:00 pm - 4:00 pm
October 8, 2017
Dabney Hall, Lounge

A talk about child safety with child safety expert Pattie Fitzgerald. This seminar teaches parents, grandparents, and caregivers about keeping kids safe around people you know, don't know, or know a little bit. Learn how to establish healthy boundaries and introduce the safety conversation to kids in a non-fearful way. Childcare will be provided.

Ticket Price: $5.00

Please RSVP online at https://cwc.nationbuilder.com/an_ounce_of_prevention by Oct 7th

MOLECULARLY ENTWINED: The Caltech and City of Hope Biomedical Research Initiative

6:10 pm - 9:30 pm
October 9, 2017
Beckman Institute

Thomas F. Rosenbaum
President, Caltech
Sonja and William Davidow Presidential Chair and Professor of Physics

and

Robert W. Stone
President and CEO, City of Hope

cordially invite you to

MOLECULARLY ENTWINED, The Caltech and City of Hope Biomedical Research Initiative.

Schedule:

  • 6:15 p.m. Reception at Glanville Courtyard
  • 7:15 p.m. Program in Beckman Institute Auditorium

Seating is limited. Please RSVP by Friday, September 29, 2017.

Since 2008, the Caltech and City of Hope Biomedical Research Initiative has brought together expertise from the two institutions to work together to improve health outcomes.  This year's event highlights two of the latest projects to come from this exciting collaboration:

“An Ideal Combination: Anti-Leukemia and Anti-Aging”
presented by
WenYong Chen, Associate Professor, Department of Cancer Biology, Beckman Research Institute, City of Hope, and
Andre Hoelz, Professor of Chemistry; Investigator, Heritage Medical Research Institute, Faculty Scholar, Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Caltech

“Early T Cell Developmental Mechanism Linked to Autoimmune Disease Susceptiblity”
presented by
Ellen Rothenberg, Albert Billings Ruddock Professor of Biology, Caltech, and
Zuoming Sun, Associate Professor, Division of Immunoology, Beckman Research Institute, City of Hope

Lily Cai Chinese Dance Company

8:00 pm - 10:00 pm
October 14, 2017
Beckman Auditorium

Lily Cai blends ancient Chinese forms with modern dance to create captivating and inventive forms to produce an innovative performance.

Learn More: www.lilycaidance.org

Buy Tickets

‘The Invention of Nature,’ Alexander von Humboldt, and the Merging of the Arts and the Sciences

7:30 pm - 9:00 pm
October 16, 2017
Baxter Lecture Hall

The book The Invention of Nature tells the story of Alexander von Humboldt (1769–1859), the great thinker and intrepid explorer who has more things named after him than anyone else – from the Humboldt Current to towns, rivers, mountain ranges, and a penguin. Though almost forgotten today, Humboldt was the most famous scientist of his time.

His restless life was packed with adventure and discovery, whether exploring deep into the rainforest or climbing the world's highest volcanoes. He saw nature as a web of life and amazingly predicted harmful, human–induced climate change in 1800. He turned scientific observation into poetic narrative, and his writings inspired naturalists and poets, including Darwin and Goethe, as well as politicians, such as Jefferson.

This talk by historian and author Andrea Wulf focuses on Humboldt's insight that there is a bond between the arts and the sciences, between imagination, poetry, and meticulous observation. He insisted we should use our feelings as well as scientific data to understand the world around us. The Invention of Nature brings this lost hero to science and forgotten father of environmentalism back to life.

This event is part of the James Michelin Distinguished Visitors Program, presented by the Division of the Humanities and Social SciencesThe talk is free, with no tickets or reservations required.

Wulf will also give lectures on October 15 and October 17 at The Huntington Library, Art Collections, and Botanical Gardens.

About the Speaker

Andrea Wulf is the author of five acclaimed books. The Brother Gardeners won the 2010 American Horticultural Society Book Award, and her books Founding Gardeners and The Invention of Nature were on the New York Times Best Sellers list. Wulf has written for many newspapers, including the Guardian, Los Angeles Times, Wall Street Journal, and New York Times. She writes a regular column on the history of science for the Atlantic. In 2014, she co-presented a four-part BBC TV garden series, and she appears regularly on radio.

The Invention of Nature won the prestigious Costa Biography Award in 2015 and the Royal Geographical Ness Award (UK), the inaugural James Wright Award for Nature Writing, and the Los Angeles Times Book Prize in 2016. It was a finalist for the Kirkus Prize in 2015 and was chosen as one of the 10 Best Books of 2015 by the New York Times. The book was also shortlisted for the Andrew Carnegie Medal for Excellence in Nonfiction and the Royal Society Science Book Prize in 2016.

Caltech-Huntington Humanities Collaborations (CHHC) Brown Bag Seminar: Leah Klement, Caltech

12:00 pm - 1:00 pm
October 18, 2017
Dabney Hall 110 (Treasure Room)

Please check later for additional details

_______________________________________________________________________________________________

The Caltech-Huntington Humanities Collaborations (“CHHC”) program is organized around an ongoing series of two-year interdisciplinary research modules, developed and coordinated by a small group of Caltech faculty members and Huntington residential research fellows. The 2016–2018 CHHC module, titled “Violence and Order Past and Present,” studies the various roles that violence has played in political and social order, as well as the possible norms and cultural attitudes that have governed its use. Learn more at chhc.caltech.edu.

Associates East Coast Program: Designing Molecules

6:00 pm - 9:00 pm
October 18, 2017
Off Campus

Location: India House, New York (Note that event times are shown in Eastern Time.)

6:00 p.m. Reception
7:00 p.m. Dinner and program

Mikhail Shapiro, assistant professor of chemical engineering, shares his experience in externally communicating with specially designed molecules inside the human body.

For inquiries, please contact Ruby Rico with the Caltech Associates office at caltechassociates@caltech.edu or (626) 395-6392.

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This event is open to members of the Caltech Associates and guests. For more information and to learn how to join, please visit our website or contact the Associates office at (626) 395-3919

With a proud history of support dating back to 1926, the Caltech Associates are a vibrant organization of more than 2,000 members who are investors in discovery. Membership helps advance Caltech's most ambitious projects, including new treatments for disease, insights into nature, and technologies that could change the way people live their lives.

Caltech is changing the world. You can be part of it by joining the Caltech Associates and help shape tomorrow. Visit: https://www.associates.caltech.edu

 

Stargazing Lecture

8:00 pm - 10:00 pm
October 20, 2017
Cahill, Hameetman Auditorium

Our dynamic Universe is adorned by cosmic fireworks: energetic and ephemeral beacons of light that are a million (nova) to a billion (supernova) times brighter than our sun. Lately, we have discovered new types of optical and infrared fireworks with luminosities in the gap between novae and supernovae. The astrophysics of the new fireworks suggests we are witnessing stellar mergers (e.g. white dwarfs merging with neutron stars, neutron stars merging with black holes). The astrochemistry of the new fireworks suggests they serve as cosmic mines where various elements in the periodic table (e.g., Calcium, Platinum) are synthesized. 

About the Series

Stargazing Lectures are free lectures at a public level followed by guided stargazing with telescopes (weather permitting). All events are held at the Cahill Center for Astronomy and Astrophysics at Caltech. No reservations are needed. Lectures are 30 minutes; stargazing lasts 90 minutes. Stay only as long as you want.

Stargazing is only possible with clear skies, but the lecture, slideshow, and Q&A takes place regardless of weather.

For directions, weather updates, and more information, please visit: http://outreach.astro.caltech.edu.

Download the series flyer (PDF)

 

 

SURF Seminar Day

9:00 am - 5:30 pm
October 21, 2017

Please join us at this exciting symposium where over 230 students will present their research projects and discuss their findings in 25 concurrent oral sessions plus a poster session. We invite all members of our community – students, faculty, alumni, staff, friends, family, and guests – to celebrate our students' achievements!

9:00 AM Registrations Opens

10:00 AM – 4:00 PM – Student Presentations

3:45 – 5:15 PM – Poster Session and Reception at San Pasqual Mall

To help us prepare for the day, please register here: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/2017-surf-seminar-day-registration-tickets-37472589524

View the full schedule at www.sfp.caltech.edu after October 13, 2017

Heath Quartet

3:30 pm - 5:30 pm
October 22, 2017
Beckman Auditorium

The best storytellers display an infectious passion. And the Heath Quartet—which in 2013 became the first ensemble in 15 years to win the Royal Philharmonic Society's Young Artists Award— exemplifies this. The ensemble performs, says The Telegraph, “with fierce intelligence and feeling, passion and virtuosity.”

The members' commitment to chamber music has led them far beyond London, where they are professors of Chamber Music at the Guildhall School of Music and Drama. Past tours have included Carnegie Hall, the Kilkenny Arts Festival, the BBC Proms, the Concertgebouw Amsterdam, Queen's Hall Edinburgh, and Lincoln Center. Their 2016 recording of the Tippett quartets on Harmonia Mundi were praised by Gramophone as “A tremendous achievement.”

Program

Haydn – Quartet in D minor, Op. 76, No. 2, “Quinten”
Tippett – Quartet No. 2 in F-sharp Major
Bach — Three Chorale Preludes
Mendelssohn – Quartet No. 6 in F minor, Op. 80

More info: http://www.colemanchambermusic.org

Buy Tickets

Caltech Public Events

Coleman Chamber Music Association

November

Caltech Associates President’s Circle Travel Program: Napa and Sonoma

12:00 am
November 8, 2017 - November 12, 2017
Off Campus

Explore the science of wine and learn how Napa and Sonoma create some of the world's most distinctive vintages with wine connoisseurs David Baltimore and Alice Huang and experience a hands-on cooking class and exclusive winery tours and tastings with Caltech's renowned chef and pranking guru Tom Mannion

November 8-12, 2017

View save the date
Formal invitation and trip details to follow

For more information, please contact Megan Schmid at megans@caltech.edu or (626) 395-4644.

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This travel program is open to President's Circle members of the Caltech Associates. For more information and to learn how to join, please visit our website or contact the Associates office at (626) 395-3919

With a proud history of support dating back to 1926, the Caltech Associates are a vibrant organization of more than 2,000 members who are investors in discovery. Membership helps advance Caltech's most ambitious projects, including new treatments for disease, insights into nature, and technologies that could change the way people live their lives.

Caltech is changing the world. You can be part of it by joining the Caltech Associates and help shape tomorrow. Visit: https://www.associates.caltech.edu

The Susie Glaze New Folk Ensemble

8:00 pm - 10:00 pm
November 11, 2017
Beckman Institute Auditorium

Award-winning vocalist, Susie Glaze, mandolinist Steve Rankin, fiddler Mark Indictor and bassist Fred Sanders are The Susie Glaze New Folk Ensemble, the newest version of the acclaimed Los Angeles-based Americana group, a lush new folk Americana fusion ensemble, presenting gorgeous eclectic blends of mountain folk and exciting new grassy and Celtic-inspired originals, all with the remarkable voice of Susie Glaze.

The group has been likened to the classic British bands Pentangle and Fairport Convention in that they blend classic folk music with rough-edged stories of tragedy and fate, all with orchestral arrangements sounding like chamber music gone folk! The band has appeared at many premier venues and festivals on the West Coast, including Berkeley's Freight & Salvage, McCabe's Guitar Shop, The Broad Stage, the Hollywood Bowl, Palms Playhouse, Don Quixote's Music Hall, and the Kuumbwa Jazz Center, among others.

Their CD White Swan was released in March of 2013 to critical acclaim from No Depression, FolkWorks, Pop Matters, M Magazine for Musicians, Music News Nashville and FolkWords UK among others, and charted in the Top 50 on the Roots Music Report's Combined Internet and Terrestrial Folk Chart. Their new album Not That Kind of Girl, produced by Herb Pedersen, was released in June 2015 and is enjoying critical acclaim and radio airplay around the country.

“If there were a word to describe this fine band, it would be sophisticated. They draw influences from disparate sources to meld their sound. The level of musicianship is exemplary.… display a great range of prowess and work as a tight unit.” — Bluegrass Unlimited.

“…one of the finest and most original Americana groups in California (or in the country for that matter).” No Depression.

Augmenting their sound is the lush, Celtic sounds of Rankin's bouzouki, the mountain sounds of Susie's Appalachian dulcimer and traditional autoharp, with Mark Indictor's virtuoso fiddling and Fred Sanders' remarkable bass work rounding out the orchestral nature of this amazing ensemble. Joining the group for this show at Caltech will be their original songwriter and lead guitarist, original founding member of the Hilonesome Band, Rob Carlson. Visit their web site at wwww.susieglaze.com

Susie Glaze has been honored to be included on the newly-released Compass Records tribute album Dear Jean – Artists Celebrate Jean Ritchiealongside such artists as Judy Collins, Pete Seeger, Janis Ian, Tim O'Brien, John McCutcheon, Robin and Linda Williams and many more. Copies of this CD will be available at this show.

“The band is tight, great picking, and beautiful vocals and harmony.” KVMR, Nevada City, CA 

“She held the audience in the palm of her hand….” Scott Valley Bluegrass Festival 

“…does something with a song that only great singers can do…” KCSN, Northridge, CA 

“One of the most beautiful voices in bluegrass and folk music today.” KPFK's FolkScene 

“…with people like this to trust, my music will go on living, and soaring. And so will I.” Jean Ritchie

More Info: http://www.susieglaze.com 

Buy Tickets

Caltech Public Events

Pasadena Folk Music Society

Stargazing Lecture

7:00 pm - 9:00 pm
November 17, 2017
Cahill, Hameetman Auditorium

One important consequence of Einstein's theory of relativity is that massive objects can bend light, an effect known as “gravitational lensing.” Over the years, astronomers have learned to take advantage of this intriguing phenomenon to learn about everything from black holes to dark matter to galaxy clusters. In this lecture, I'll demystify the science behind gravitational lensing and take you on a tour of the amazing breakthroughs it has enabled. 

About the Series

Stargazing Lectures are free lectures at a public level followed by guided stargazing with telescopes (weather permitting). All events are held at the Cahill Center for Astronomy and Astrophysics at Caltech. No reservations are needed. Lectures are 30 minutes; stargazing lasts 90 minutes. Stay only as long as you want.

Stargazing is only possible with clear skies, but the lecture, slideshow, and Q&A takes place regardless of weather.

For directions, weather updates, and more information, please visit: http://outreach.astro.caltech.edu.

Download the series flyer (PDF)

 

 

The Astronomer’s Dream

4:00 pm - 5:00 pm
November 18, 2017
Beckman Auditorium

What would 17th Century astronomer Johannes Kepler have seen if he had had today's advanced technology? The Astronomer's Dream is a 3D journey through a computer graphic visualization of space, based on data obtained by NASA satellites.

Sony HD Programs © Sony PCL Inc.

Anna Ho, a graduate student in astronomy at Caltech, will introduce the film and guide the post-screening discussion.

Recommended for ages 8 and up.

 

December

The Alley Cats: “Jingle Bell Rock”

8:00 pm - 10:00 pm
December 2, 2017
Beckman Auditorium

The Alley Cats, a talented and funny doo-wop a cappella group, performs songs for the holidays.

Learn More: www.thealleycats.com

Buy Tickets

Stargazing Lecture

7:00 pm - 9:00 pm
December 8, 2017
Cahill, Hameetman Auditorium

Our Solar System contains two very distinct types of large gas clouds: a star and gas planets. The major difference between these two types of objects is their mass, the amount of material in each of them. Our star, the Sun, is one thousand times more massive than Jupiter, the biggest gas planet in our Solar System. When we look out of our neighborhood, however, we spot some objects that have masses in between stars and planets, and they carry some very interesting properties. These “brown dwarfs” behave a little bit like stars and a little bit like planets. I will discuss the physics behind brown dwarfs, how difficult they are to find, and how they act as a “missing link” to teach us about how both stars and planets form and evolve. 

About the Series

Stargazing Lectures are free lectures at a public level followed by guided stargazing with telescopes (weather permitting). All events are held at the Cahill Center for Astronomy and Astrophysics at Caltech. No reservations are needed. Lectures are 30 minutes; stargazing lasts 90 minutes. Stay only as long as you want.

Stargazing is only possible with clear skies, but the lecture, slideshow, and Q&A takes place regardless of weather.

For directions, weather updates, and more information, please visit: http://outreach.astro.caltech.edu.

Download the series flyer (PDF)

 

 
 

Planet Earth – Deserts

4:00 pm - 5:00 pm
December 16, 2017
Beckman Auditorium

While many believe that all deserts are similar expanses of dry land, a lack of rainwater is perhaps the only thing that unifies these diverse habitats. With incredible aerial and time-lapse footage, see how animals have learned to survive without the most precious resource of all.

A BBC/Discovery Channel/NHK co-production in association with the CBC.

Annelise Thompson, a graduate student in chemistry and chemical engineering at Caltech, will introduce the film and guide the post-screening discussion.

Recommended for ages 8 and up.

 

January

Life: Challanges of Life

4:00 pm - 5:00 pm
January 27, 2018
Beckman Auditorium

Introducing the extraordinary things animals and plants must do in order to survive and reproduce. Key animals: Brown-tufted capuchins, dolphins, cheetahs, chameleons and killer whales.

A BBC/Discovery/SKAI/Open University co-production in association with RTI Spa.

Christopher Spalding, a graduate student in geological and planetary sciences at Caltech, will introduce the film and guide the post-screening discussion.

Recommended for ages 8 and up.

 

Jim Malcolm

8:00 pm - 10:00 pm
January 27, 2018
Beckman Institute Auditorium

Jim Malcolm has performed in our series five times and also once or twice when he was a member of Old Blind Dogs. The pattern has been to have him every other year, but because of a scheduling conflict in 2017, we're making up for missing him last January.

Jim continues to be one of Scotland's finest singers, accompanying himself on 6- and 12-string guitar, as well as on harmonica. Living Tradition called him “one of the finest singing voices in Scotland in any style,” and The Scotsman wrote “Jim Malcolm will just melt you in your seat.”

In performance, he splits his time between singing original songs, many of which end up getting recorded by others, and he sings songs written or passed down by some of Scotland's fine writers, including early ballads from Robert Burns, Robert Tannahill, William Soutar, and his great hero Jim Reid.

More Info: http://jimmalcolm.com

Buy Tickets

Caltech Public Events

Pasadena Folk Music Society

March

Earth – Power of the Planet: Ice

4:00 pm - 5:00 pm
March 17, 2018
Beckman Auditorium

Ice may be nothing more than frozen water, but it holds extraordinary power. Descending deep down a frozen waterfall, this program looks at a glacier in action from below and discovers why the huge Jacobshaven glacier is retreating, how it shapd our past and why it may now threaten our future.

A BBC/National Geographic Channel US/ZDF co-production.

Alexander Robel, a NOAA postdoctoral scholar in geological and planetary sciences at Caltech, will introduce the film and guide the post-screening discussion.

Recommended for ages 8 and up.

 

Octopus Challenge

4:00 pm - 5:00 pm
March 24, 2018
Beckman Auditorium

The octopus is a truly remarkable creature. This amusing and insightful program shows the octopus in action – squeezing into tiny spaces, sniffing out hidden food, even opening doors. These soft-bodied, boneless mollusks appear to outshine all the other invertebrates, but are they clever or just instinctive?

A BBC/Animal Planet co-production.

Justin Rolando, a graduate student in chemistry and chemical engineering at Caltech, will introduce the film and guide the post-screening discussion.

Recommended for ages 8 and up.

 

The Kingston Trio

8:00 pm - 10:00 pm
March 31, 2018
Beckman Auditorium

Through changing times, the Kingston Trio has played on, remaining popular for a simple reason: great songs that sound as good today as the first time you heard them. And 60 years after “Tom Dooley” shot to the top of the charts, the Trio is still on the road 30 weeks a year, bringing back all the great memories and making new ones, with their trademark three-part harmony and clean, crisp sound.

Learn More: www.kingstontrio.com

Buy Tickets

April

Caltech-Huntington Humanities Collaborations (CHHC) Seminar: Catherine Nall, Royal Holloway, University of London

4:00 pm - 5:00 pm
April 4, 2018
Dabney Hall 110 (Treasure Room)

Please check later for additional details

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About the series: The CHHC program is organized around an ongoing series of two-year interdisciplinary research modules, developed and coordinated by a small group of Caltech faculty members and Huntington residential research fellows. The 2016–2018 CHHC module, titled “Violence and Order Past and Present,” studies the various roles that violence has played in political and social order, as well as the possible norms and cultural attitudes that have governed its use. Learn more at chhc.caltech.edu.

m-pact: Pop-Jazz Vocals

8:00 pm - 10:00 pm
April 21, 2018
Beckman Auditorium

Hailed as “one of the best pop-jazz vocal groups in the world” by the San Francisco Chronicle, m-pact is respected worldwide as a cutting edge trailblazer in the realm of vocal music.

Their sophisticated sound and accessible appeal have garnered vast accolades, from Vocal Group of the Year (the LA Music Awards), an Indie nomination (the Independent Grammy), and Artist of the Year (Seattle Music Awards), to Grand National Champs of the Harmony Sweepstakes competition.

Learn More: www.m-pact.com

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May

The Capitol Steps

8:00 pm - 10:00 pm
May 5, 2018
Beckman Auditorium

The Capitol Steps have elevated political satire to an art form. Before The Daily Show, Full Frontal, and The Colbert Report, this Washington, DC-based comedy troupe gave audience laugh cramps with their bipartisan lampooning.

The Capitol Steps began in 1981 as a group of Senate staffers who set out to satirize their employers, and haven't let up since. If you've been keeping with the news, you know there's no shortage of material. The troupe is coming back to Pasadena with a new show of musical and political comedy. 

It doesn't matter if you're a Republican or Democrat, a snowflake, or a deplorable: neither side is safe from the group that puts the “MOCK” in Democracy!

“The best musical satire on Washington I've ever seen!”
—The Washington Times

Learn More: www.capsteps.com

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Bryan Bowers

8:00 pm - 10:00 pm
May 12, 2018
Beckman Institute Auditorium

Though other talented folks have followed in his footsteps, Bryan Bowers continues to be the pinnacle of autoharp playing in the folk music world, and he delivers a fine mix of songs, instrumentals, and stories. Bryan will be in California for his annual visit to the California Autoharp Gathering in the Fresno area in May. We heard Bryan at the Fret House in 2017, and he continues to amaze with plenty of new songs in his repertoire.

Born in Yorktown, Virginia, Bryan was profoundly affected by the singing of field and railroad workers, and this style of singing is an important part of his sound. It wasn't until college that he took up playing the autoharp, but he quickly became a master of the instrument that he has redefined over the years. He is as important to modern autoharp playing as Earl Scruggs has been to the banjo. In his hands, the autoharp has amazing capabilities of notes and chords, and his playing brings to mind a full orchestra, with its full-bodied and varied sound.

He mixes a few original songs with some gospel, traditional, and songs of current songwriters, many of them very funny, such as “Zen Gospel Singing.” Bryan's humor, easy manner, and natural storytelling abilities make his performances a pure delight.

More Info: http://bryanbowers.com

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Caltech Public Events

Pasadena Folk Music Society